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Our collection of podcasts is available for download on SoundCloud or iTunes U, under the Yale University Humanities section, or you may subscribe to a RSS Feed that will automatically update whenever new content is released. You may listen to our featured podcasts in streaming mp3 format by following the links below:

Organized by

 
Ben Dunning, Jörg Frey, Dale Martin Wayne Meeks, Hindy Najman
Antisemitism in the Ancient Mediterranean? Early Christianity and Anti-Judaism
Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism - 4/4/2013
SUMMARY:


 
Michael Pollan
"Michael Pollan ‘Raw’: A Conversation with Michael Pollan and Jack Hitt about cooking, eating, and writing”
Franke Program in Science and the Humanities - 3/30/2013
SUMMARY: Michael Pollan, critically acclaimed author and journalist, sits down with writer Jack Hitt to discuss the former’s recent work and other topics related to food and cooking.


 
Andrew Gerber
How the Mind Models the World: New Ideas from MRI Findings
Shulman Lecture - 3/5/2013
SUMMARY:


 
Linda Mayes Helena Rutherford
The Psychobiology of Parenting and Attachment
Shulman Lecture - 2/19/2013
SUMMARY:


 
Peter Meineck
Combat Trauma and the Tragic Stage: Ancient Drama and Modern Catharsis
Franke Lecture - 11/28/2012
SUMMARY: In addition to texts by the major Greek dramatists, Prof. Meineck considers non-dramatic works from the history and philosophy of the period, as well as the history of Athenian stagecraft, as part of a culture for which the scars of war were a factor of everyday life.Prof. Meineck is a Clinical Associate Professor of Classics at New York University as well as the founder and artist director of the Aquila Theatre Company, which brings Ancient and contemporary plays to the stage in a manner designed to appeal to the widest audience possible. He has translated works by Sophocles, Aristophanes, Aeschylus and others, and is the recipient of numerous awards for his translations and teaching.


 
Simon Goldhill
Sappho, Lincoln, and the Senate: Picturing Nineteenth-Century Female Desire
Franke Lecture - 11/27/2012
SUMMARY:


 
Frank Salmon
Carrying Off the Colosseum: British Architectural Encounters with Rome in the 1770s
Franke Lecture - 11/8/2012
SUMMARY:


 
Steven Pinker
The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence has Declined
Franke Program in Science and the Humanities - 11/1/2012
SUMMARY:


 
Rebecca Newberger Goldstein
Romancing Spinoza
Franke Visiting Fellow Lecture - 10/2/2012
SUMMARY: Goldstein challenges a cultural portrait of Spinoza as distant from aesthetic concerns, and meditates upon Spinoza’s imprint upon writers including Melville, Goethe, George Eliot, Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Heine. Granted a prestigious “genius award” by the MacArthur Foundation, Goldstein is the author of several acclaimed philosophically-minded novels, has held multiple prestigious teaching appointments at universities including Columbia and Rutgers, and has written biographies of Kurt Godel and Spinoza.


 
Kate Tempest
“Slamlet” featuring Kate Tempest and Yale’s Teeth Slam Poets
Whitney Humanities Center - 4/9/2012
SUMMARY: The event features a guest performance by Kate Tempest, a London based spoken word artist. “Slamet” was presented as part of Shakespeare at Yale, a semester of events celebrating Shakespeare’s history and continued influence on contemporary culture. Ms. Tempest has performed extensively in Europe and the United States, and her work has received wide critical praise.


 
Terrence William Deacon
Adapted to a Symbolic Niche: How Less became more in Human Evolution
Shulman Lecture - 3/27/2012
SUMMARY: Terrence W. Deacon delivers a lecture on the neuroscience and development of the human capacity for language and musical perception. Prof. Deacon is the Chair of the Anthropology Department at the University of California at Berkeley. His research interests lie in the field of brain development and evolution, the origins of language, and bio-cultural evolution. Many of these interests are found in his book, The Symbolic Species: The Coevolution of Language and the Brain (1997). His lecture presented here, on the formation of human language and symbolic thought, is a part of the Shulman Lectures in Science and the Humanities delivered at the Whitney Humanities Center at Yale University.
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Peter Brooks, Kai Erikson, Geoffrey Hartman, Robert Shulman
For the Record: A Conversation Reflecting on Thirty Years of the Whitney Humanities Center
Whitney Humanities Center - 2/28/2012
SUMMARY: A conversation reflecting on thirty years of Yale’s Whitney Humanities Center with Peter Brooks, Founding Director, and Founding Fellows Kai Erikson, Geoffrey Hartman, and Robert Shulman is held as part of the Whitney’s 30th Anniversary celebration. In 1981, the Whitney Humanities Center began at Yale University under the new university presidency of A. Bartlett Giamatti. For this celebration of thirty year’s growth and activity at Yale, the WHC’s founding director and three of its founding fellows return to discuss and offer reflections on their experience both in the University at large and their place at the WHC within it, especially with regard to the role of the humanities in relation to the sciences in the undergraduate experience at Yale. Peter Brooks, Founding Director, is Sterling Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature at Yale University and Andrew W. Mellon Scholar in the department of Comparative Literature and the Center for Human Values at Princeton. Kai Erikson is the William R. Kenen Jr. Professor Emeritus of Sociology and American Studies at Yale. Geoffrey Hartman is Sterling Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scholar of English and Comparative Literature at Yale, and Robert Shulman is Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry and Senior Research Scientist in Diagnostic Radiology.
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Jamshed Bharucha
The Alignment and Synchronization of Brain States Through Music
Shulman Lecture - 2/21/2012
SUMMARY: In this lecture, cognitive neuroscientist Jamshed Bharucha discusses the ways that music creates emotion and how these emotions work within human interactions and relationships. Professor Bharucha, who is also a classically trained violinist, has written extensively on the cognitive and neural underpinnings of music and has been awarded grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health for his work. He began his academic career at Dartmouth College, where he was the John Wentworth Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences. He also served as Associate Dean, Deputy Provost, and Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences; a signature accomplishment of his administrative work at Dartmouth was the creation of the nation’s first brain-imaging facility for the study of cognitive neuroscience outside a clinical setting. In July of 2011 he was named President of the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.
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Mark A. Peterson
Galileo, Mathematics, and the Arts
Franke Program in Science and the Humanities - 1/18/2012
SUMMARY: Mark A. Peterson discusses Galileo’s study of mathematics in relation to the arts. Prof. Peterson argues that Galileo the mathematician, steeped in the art and literature of his day, needs to be better known, separate from his work as an astronomer. Dr. Peterson is Chair of Physics and Professor of both Mathematics and Physics at Mount Holyoke College. His research often explores the intersection of science and the humanities, history of science, as well as biophysical research. Professor Peterson has published on such varied topics as computer science, Galileo, models of microhydrodynamics in biophysical settings, and others.
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Jonathan Galassi
A Translator's Confession
Finzi-Contini Lecture - 11/9/2011
SUMMARY: Focusing on his translations of Eugenio Montale and Giacomo Leopardi, Galassi shares his personal experiences as what he calls an 'impassioned amateur' engaging in the words, poems, and literary output of others and writing in a language not one's own. In addition to his work as a publisher and translator, Galassi is a poet in his own right, having published two collections of his own poems. He was also poetry editor for The Paris Review for ten years and an honorary chairman of the Academy of American Poets.


 
William Barcham
Public Life and Festivals in Eighteenth-Century Venice
Franke Lecture - 11/3/2011
SUMMARY: Delivered as a part of the lecture series accompanying the Franke Seminar entitles, Art and Music in Venice, Prof. Barcham's lecture treats the genre of painting social and civic events in the city of Venice, such as Carnivale, religious Feast Day celebrations, and other civic rituals. View painters, such as Canaletto and Francesco Guardi, painted numerous depictions of these distinctively Venetian festivities for purposes of sale and export and the fashioning of Venetian identity. Prof. Barcham is a specialist in Venetian art and culture and has published numerous works on Canaletto, Giambattista Tiepolo, Federico Cornaro, and the image of the Man of Sorrows in the later Middle Ages.


 
David Rosand
Painting Music in Renaissance Venice
Franke Lecture - 10/13/2011
SUMMARY: As a guest speaker giving a public lecture to accompany the Franke Seminar on Art and Music in Venice in the Fall of 2011, Prof. Rosand’s presentation examines the depictions of music in Venetian Renaissance painting, including personifications of music itself, musicians, concerts, and instruments in the art of Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese, and their circle. Prof. Rosand also considers the metaphorical meaning of music as a signifier of harmony and order, and how those values were transferred to the image of Venice itself and Venetian culture. Prof. Rosand is the Meyer Schapiro Professor emeritus of Art History at Columbia University and has published numerous books on Venetian painting in the Renaissance.


 
Deborah Howard
Music and Architecture in Renaissance Venice
Franke Lecture - 9/15/2011
SUMMARY: Prof. Howard's lecture considers the acoustical needs of various composers and performers in the architectural spaces of Renaissance Venice. Her important research explores the performance possibilities in the various churches and concert venues of Venice and the way in which music written for those spaces may have sounded to different audiences. Prof. Howard is Professor of Architectural History in the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art and a Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge. She has published numerous books on the art and architecture of Venice and the Veneto.


 
Danny Meyer
The Power of Hospitality
Franke Lecture - 4/18/2011
SUMMARY: Danny Meyer discusses the role and concept of hospitality in the context of the restaurant industry, and how hospitality contributes to an excellent dining experience and thus to a successful restaurant business. Mr. Meyer is the CEO of Union Square Hospitality Group, which includes Union Square Cafe, Gramercy Tavern, Eleven Madison Park, Tabla, Blue Smoke, Jazz Standard, Shake Shack, The Modern, the cafes at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art, Maialino, as well as Union Square Events, the company’s catering and events business, and Hospitality Quotient, a learning business empowering companies to transform their business through the power of hospitality. Mr. Meyer, his restaurants, and chefs have earned an unprecedented twenty-one James Beard Awards. Mr. Meyer coauthored the Union Square Cafe Cookbook (1994) and Second Helpings from Union Square Cafe (2001) with his partner, Chef Michael Romano. His first business book, Setting the Table (2006), was named a bestseller by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and BusinessWeek. An active national leader in the fight against hunger, Mr. Meyer has long served on the boards of Share Our Strength and City Harvest. He is equally active in civic affairs, serving on the executive committees of NYC & Co, Union Square Partnership, and the Madison Square Park Conservancy.
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M. Donoghue, J. Gauthier, J. Prosek, R. Prum, K. de Queiroz and Z. Szabo
Michael Donoghue, Jacques Gauthier, James Prosek, Richard Prum, Kevin de Queiroz and Zoltan Szabo
Naming Nature: A Conversation on the Nature, Use and Limitations of Biological Taxonomies
Shulman Lecture - 4/15/2011
SUMMARY: A multi-disciplinary panel of evolutionary biologists, joined by a philosopher and an artist, discuss how and why we order and describe the natural world the way that we do now and possible alternatives. The featured speakers from Yale are Michael Donoghue, the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Jacques Gauthier, professor of geology and geophysics and curator of vertebrate paleontology and vertebrate zoology at the Peabody Museum; Richard Prum, the William Robertson Coe Professor of Ornithology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; and Zoltan Szabo, professor of philosophy. Also taking part in the discussion are Kevin de Queiroz, curator and research zoologist at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, and artist, writer and naturalist James Prosek.
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Jan Golinski
Sublime Science in the Late Enlightenment: Adam Walker and the Eidouranion
Shulman Lecture - 4/7/2011
SUMMARY: Prof. Golinski discusses the links between public science and aesthetics at the turn of the 19th century by focusing on inventor Adam Walker’s device for projecting astronomical effects on a screen. Called the Eidouranion, this early pre-cinema, with its mix of music and visual effects, made Walker one of the most successful scientific lecturers of his day, in part because of his explicit invocation of the sublime.
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Adina Hoffman and Peter Cole
Sacred Trash: The Lost and Found World of the Cairo Geniza
Franke Lecture - 4/4/2011
SUMMARY: In this lecture, writers Adina Hoffamn and Peter Cole discuss the recovery of a cache of Hebrew manuscripts from a Cairo geniza (repository for sacred text), whose discovery and analysis have shed light on 900 years of Jewish life. NEA, NEH, Guggenheim and McArthur award-winning poet and translator, Peter Cole was the Franke Visiting Fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center in 2006. Adina Hoffman is the author of House of Windows: Portraits from a Jerusalem Neighborhood and My Happiness Bears No Relation to Happiness: A Poet’s Life in the Palestinian Century, a biography of Taha Muhammad Ali, from Yale University Press. Her essays and literary criticism have appeared in the Nation, the TLS, the Raritan, the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, New York Newsday, World Literature Today, and on the World Service of the BBC. Ms. Hoffman was the Franke Visiting Fellow in 2008. Together Ms. Hoffman and Mr. Cole are the founders and editors of Ibis Editions—a small press that publishes the literature of the Levant.
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M. Cunningham, H. Frankfurt, R. Newberger Goldstein, and A. Hungerford
Michael Cunningham, Harry Frankfurt, Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, and Amy Hungerford
Can a Novelist Write Philisophically? Panel Discussion
Tanner Lecture - 3/25/2011
SUMMARY: In this discussion, Rebecca Goldstein, Harry Frankfurt, and Michael Cunningham discuss the ways in which novelists do and do not write philosophically. The panel is chaired by Amy Hungerford. The featured speakers are novelist and philosopher Rebecca Goldstein, professor of philosophy Harry Frankfurt, novelist and professor of English Michael Cunningham, and professor of English Amy Hungerford.
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Rebecca Newberger Goldstein
The Ancient Quarrel: Philosophy and Literature, Part Two
Tanner Lecture - 3/24/2011
SUMMARY: In the second of her two Tanner lectures, Rebecca Goldstein discusses the overlap and conflict between philosophy and the literary arts, and whether novels can be philosophically justified. Ms. Goldstein’s career bridges the divides between the humanities, the arts, and the sciences. Equally comfortable discussing physics or fiction, she is also an important voice in the current active debates between religion and science. A Koret International Book Award winner, a multiple time National Jewish Book Award winner, a MacArthur Fellow, and a Whiting Foundation Writer's Award winner, in 2008 she was designated Humanist Laureate by the International Academy of Humanism and was named Humanist of the Year 2011 by the American Humanist Association. Her books include Finding Spinoza, 36 Arguments for the Existence of God, Incompleteness, Mazel, and The Mind Body Problem.
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Rebecca Newberger Goldstein
The Ancient Quarrel: Philosophy and Literature, Part One
Tanner Lecture - 3/23/2011
SUMMARY: In the first of her two tanner lectures, Rebecca Goldstein discusses the overlap and conflict between philosophy and the literary arts, and whether novels can be philosophically justified. Ms. Goldstein’s career bridges the divides between the humanities, the arts, and the sciences. Equally comfortable discussing physics or fiction, she is also an important voice in the current active debates between religion and science. A Koret International Book Award winner, a multiple time National Jewish Book Award winner, a MacArthur Fellow, and a Whiting Foundation Writer's Award winner, in 2008 she was designated Humanist Laureate by the International Academy of Humanism and was named Humanist of the Year 2011 by the American Humanist Association. Her books include Finding Spinoza, 36 Arguments for the Existence of God, Incompleteness, Mazel, and The Mind Body Problem.
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Noel Carroll
Art, Aesthetics, and Evolution
Shulman Lecture - 3/3/2011
SUMMARY: Noel Carroll discusses art as socio-emotional contagion: how the emotional arousal brought about by the arts provides important forms of social and emotional education that justify the social costs of the arts over the course of human history. Mr. Carroll is a Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the CUNY Graduate Center. His research interests include aesthetic theory; philosophy of film, literature, and the visual arts; social and cultural theory; philosophy of history; ethics; philosophy of the emotions; and history of early modern philosophy. Mr. Carroll has published more than fifteen books, most recently, Art in Three Dimensions (2010) and On Criticism (2009). He has also written extensively as a journalist and is the author of five documentaries.
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Susan Tucker
Inscribing Food/Talking Life: New Orleans Past
Franke Lecture - 3/2/2011
SUMMARY: Susan Tucker, Curator of Books and Records at the Newcomb Center for Research on Women at Tulane University, gives the third Franke lecture in 2011 series, “History of Food and Cuisine.” Her talk is entitled “Inscribing Food/Talking Life: New Orleans Past.” Ms. Tucker is the author of Telling Memories Among Southern Women (1988); coeditor of The Scrapbook in American Life (2005), and editor of New Orleans Cuisine: Fourteen Signature Dishes and Their Histories (2009). More recently, Ms. Tucker is exploring the various forms in which family memories are kept, including the inscription of recipes and other food lore.
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Michael Ryan
Sexual Selection and the Brain: An Origin of Evolutionary Aesthetics
Shulman Lecture - 2/24/2011
SUMMARY: In this lecture, Michael Ryan discusses the relationship between animal aesthetic preferences, sexual selection, and evolutionary biology. Dr. Ryan is the Clark Hubbs Professor of Zoology at the University of Texas at Austin. His research involves animal behavior, focusing on mechanisms of communication involved in mate attraction and corollary evolutionary consequences.
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Gary Tomlinson
Paleolithic Formalism and the Emergence of Music
Shulman Lecture - 2/3/2011
SUMMARY: Gary Tomlinson discusses the complex co-evolution of human music making in relation to language, technology, and cognitive and imaginative development. Professor Tomlinson is a musicologist and cultural theorist known for his interdisciplinary breadth. His teaching, lecturing, and scholarship have ranged across a diverse set of interests, including the history of opera, early-modern European musical thought and practice, the musical cultures of indigenous American societies, jazz and popular music, and the philosophy of history and critical theory. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a MacArthur “genius” award.
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Joanna Waley-Cohen
Banquets and Politics in China
Franke Lecture - 1/31/2011
SUMMARY: Joanna Waley-Cohen delivers the first Franke lecture in the 2011 series, “History of Food and Cuisine.” Her talk is titled “Banquets and Politics in China.” Ms. Waley-Cohen is currently chair of the History Department at NYU, where she has taught the history of China since 1992. Ms. Waley-Cohen has published many books and articles on Chinese law, politics, foreign relations, and culinary culture, and is currently working on two projects: a culinary history of early modern China, focused on consumption, leisure, cooking, and imperial dining practices; and an account of daily life in China around 1800.
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William Bailey and Mark Strand
A Conversation
Gallery at the Whitney talks - 11/8/2010
SUMMARY: The Whitney Humanities Center presents William Bailey and Mark Strand in conversation. The artist and the poet joined in discussion to celebrate the opening of the exhibition “William Bailey Works on Paper: Temperas, Drawings, and Prints” at the Gallery at the Whitney. One of the country’s leading figurative artists, Mr. Bailey eschews narrative, nostalgia, and materiality in his work, which instead conveys an abstract engagement whether working in still life or from the human figure. In the words of Mr. Strand, who is also the author of a monograph on Mr. Bailey, the painter’s works represent “realizations of an idea.”
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Claudia Roden
A Good Soup Holds History and Culture
Whitney Humanities Center - 10/28/2010
SUMMARY: Critically acclaimed food writer Claudia Roden, the 2010 Franke Visiting Fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center, shares the ingredients of her successful career chronicling, memorializing, and reconstructing cultural worlds through cooking. Ms. Roden has a particular interest in the historical, social, and cultural background of cooking. In the words of the historian Simon Schama, “Claudia Roden is no more a simple cookbook writer than Marcel Proust was a biscuit baker. She is, rather, memorialist, historian, ethnographer, anthropologist, essayist, poet, who just happens to communicate through ta’am—taste.” Ms. Roden’s international accolades include six Glenfiddich Awards, the James Beard Award, induction into the Cookbook Hall of Fame, and many more.
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Adonis
Adonis, pioneer of modern Arabic poetry
Whitney Humanities Center - 10/26/2010
SUMMARY: In this netcast, he and Khaled Mattawa read from Adonis: A Selection, published by Yale University Press.
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Jacqueline Jung
Some Strange Region of the Universe: Material Things in the Gothic Cathedral
Franke Lecture - 4/13/2010
SUMMARY: In her lecture, Jacqueline Jung talks about the material aspects of Gothic art and architecture and how they made the church precisely not a pure and abstract vision of heaven but a strange space partaking of both earthly and heavenly worlds. Jacqueline Jung specializes in the art and architecture of the medieval West, with an emphasis on the figural sculpture of Gothic Germany. Her teaching encompasses the history of medieval sculpture, images of death and apocalypse, art and ritual in the Middle Ages, Gothic cathedrals, medieval image-theory, medieval memory practices, and the interrelations between art and visionary experience.
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Alyce Jordan
The Sainte-Chapelle in Paris: Kingship, Crusading, and Leg
Franke Lecture - 4/6/2010
SUMMARY: In her 2010 Franke Lecture, Professor Jordan speaks about the Sainte-Chapelle as an active and activated space and how and why Louis the Ninth’s chapel proved such a successful vehicle for the articulation of his own monarchic agenda. Alyce Jordan’s research focuses on medieval stained glass and questions of narrative, identity, and representation. Her book Visualizing Kingship in the Windows of the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris applies contemporary rhetorical theory and practices to better understand the monument and posits a radical re-envisioning of the original ensemble.
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Jay Rubenstein
"Guibert de Nogent and His Demons"
Franke Lecture - 3/2/2010
SUMMARY: Prof. Rubenstein is a historian of medieval intellectual and cultural life in Europe during the 11th and 12th centuries. He is the author of 'Guibert of Nogent: Portrait of a Medieval Mind' and co-editor of 'Teaching and Learning in Northern Europe, 1000-1200,' among other works. Prof. Rubenstein received a MacArthur Fellowship in 2007. In his 2010 Franke Lecture, Rubenstein discusses the eleventh-century monk and autobiographer, Guibert de Nogent, and works to place him in the particular intellectual and built environments of his time and location, though only fragmentary evidence from these environments survive.
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Walter Cahn
“Romanesque and Gothic as Biblical Architecture”
Franke Lecture - 1/19/2010
SUMMARY: Mr. Cahn is the author of The Romanesque Wooden Doors of Auvergne; Masterpieces: Chapters on the History of an Idea; and Romanesque Bible Illumination;and numerous articles. He has been the recipient of Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellowships, and is a Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America. Here, Mr. Cahn, Carnegie Professor Emeritus of the History of Art at Yale, delivers the first Franke Lecture in the 2010 series, “The Age of Cathedrals.” Mr. Cahn discusses Romanesque and Gothic as self-consciously biblical architectural forms.
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Music at the Whitney
Shake, Rattle, and Roll!
Music at the Whitney - 12/10/2009
SUMMARY: Music at the Whitney and Yale College New Music present chamber works composed by Yale College students and faculty, performed with members of the Yale Percussion Group. This program features an interesting sonic variety and several different percussion setups: mallet keyboard, suitcase percussion, and a mixed quartet. The student compositions include “Duettino” by Andrew Davis, “Particular Features of the Tule Elk” by Ryan Harper, “Gear Shift” by Stephen Feigenbaum, “…mallet merengue” by Alexander Weiser, and “Play Nice” by Jamie van Dyck. The final work, “Dreams and Reveries,” by faculty codirector Kathryn Alexander, explores the juxtaposition of “found sound”—created with flowerpots, beercan racks, and metal pipes—with more traditional instruments.
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Carolyn Nordstrom
emergent(cies)…,
Franke Lecture - 12/3/2009
SUMMARY: Ms. Nordstrom’s principal areas of interest are the anthropology of war andpeace, illegal economies and power, gender, globalization, and culture theory. She has conducted extensive fieldwork in warzones worldwide, with long-term interests in Southern Africa and South Asia. Her academic books include Global Outlaws: Crime, Money, and Power in the Contemporary World (2007) and Shadows of War: Violence, Power, and International Profiteering in the 21st Century (2004). She has received the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship, as well as numerous other grants, including from the U.S. Institute for Peace. In her 2008 Franke Lecture, anthropologist Carolyn Nordstrom examines invisible networks of social spaces and interactions, especially the dangerous extra-state and extra-legal interactions that we are meant not to see. Paul Farmer responds to this talk.
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John Donatich
Why Books Still Matter
Whitney Humanities Center - 11/14/2009
SUMMARY: John Donatich, director of Yale University Press, delivers the keynote address of “Why Books Still Matter,” a conference commemorating the one-hundredth anniversary of the Press. The conference brought together university press publishers and scholars for a variety of panel discussions on the digital future of academic publishing, the idea of the press in the modern university, and the broader question “Whither the University Press?”
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Barbara Tversky
Spatial Thinking
Franke Lecture - 11/10/2009
SUMMARY: Tversky taught at Hebrew University and at Stanford University, where she is emerita professor of psychology. Much of her work involves human perception of space and explores topics such as memory, categorization and language; the metaphorically spatial, especially time and event perception and cognition; and applications, notably diagrams, interfaces, design and visual communication. Her recent articles include 'Visualspatial Reasoning,' 'Some Ways that Graphics Communicate,' 'What Do Sketches Say About Thinking?' and 'Multiple Mental Spaces.'
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Music at the Whitney
The First Vienna Circles
Music at the Whitney - 11/7/2009
SUMMARY: Music at the Whitney presents songs and chamber music by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert performed by Yale undergraduate music students in conjunction with the 2008 Tanner Lectures on Human Values and a series of events on intellectual circles. The program features Haydn’s La Roxelane; Mozart’s Das Veilchen, K. 476, Die Zufriedenheit, and Piano Quartet in E-flat Major, K. 493; Beethoven’s Zärtliche Liebe, WoO123, Wonne der Wehmut, op. 83, No. 1, and Piano Trio in E-flat Major, Op. 70, No. 2; and Schubert’s Sonata in D Major, D. 384 and Der Hirt auf dem Felsen, D. 965. Performer remarks on the pieces are included.
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Gino Segre, Douglas Stone, Ramamurti Shankar, Robert Shulman,
moderated by Meg Urry
The Founders of Modern Physics
Tanner Lecture - 10/31/2009
SUMMARY: Yale’s Whitney Humanities Center presents “The Founders of Modern Physics,” a panel discussion among eminent scientists exploring the revolution in quantum mechanics and its intellectual milieu. This panel was part of “Intellectual Circles and Twentieth-Century Science,” a conference organized in conjunction with a series of events surrounding the 2008 Tanner Lectures on Human Values delivered by Noble Prize–winning physicist Steven Chu.
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David Brownlee, Carles Vallhonrat, Reinhold Martin, Thomas Pollard,
moderated by Carter Wiseman
Science Building(s) Collaboration
Tanner Lecture - 10/31/2009
SUMMARY: Yale’s Whitney Humanities Center presents “Science Building(s) Collaboration,” a panel discussion considering Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute and what makes buildings work for science. This panel was part of “Intellectual Circles and Twentieth-Century Science,” a full-day conference organized in conjunction with a week-long series of events surrounding the 2008 Tanner Lectures on Human Values delivered by Noble Prize–winning physicist Steven Chu.
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Steven Chu
Golden Eras of Scientific Institutions
Tanner Lecture - 10/30/2009
SUMMARY: Steven Chu is a Nobel Prize-winning physicist and thedirector of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and professor of physics and of molecular and cell biology at the University of California-Berkeley. He was previously at Stanford and Bell Laboratories. At Stanford, he helped start Bio-X, a multidisciplinary initiative linking the physical and biological sciences with engineering and medicine. In 2009 Prof. Chu was appointed the 12th United States Secretary of Energy. Prof. Chu's second lecture draws on his experience at Bell Labs and Stanford’s Bio-X to discuss what best enables institutions to support effective interdisciplinary collaboration and scientific progress.
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Steven Chu
The Epistemology of Physics and Scientific Revolutions
Tanner Lecture - 10/29/2009
SUMMARY: Steven Chu is a Nobel Prize-winning physicist and thedirector of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and professor of physics and of molecular and cell biology at the University of California-Berkeley. He was previously at Stanford and Bell Laboratories. At Stanford, he helped start Bio-X, a multidisciplinary initiative linking the physical and biological sciences with engineering and medicine. In 2009 Prof. Chu was appointed the 12th United States Secretary of Energy. Prof. Chu's first lecture gives a brief history of how scientific revolutions build on previous scientific revolutions, focusing on physics from Ptolemy to Copernicus, Kepler and Newton, and on to today’s counter-intuitive physical theories.
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John Adams
Doctor Atomic and His Gadget: Composing the American Mythology
Tanner Lecture - 10/29/2009
SUMMARY: Known for moving American concert music away from academic modernism and toward a more expansive humanist musical language, Adams brings wide ranging creative insight to his Tanner Lectures. As well as his renowned orchestral and choral work and politically charged operas, Adams’ recent memoir, “Hallelujah Junction: Composing an American Life,” has been lauded as an explication of the creative process and was named a New York Times Notable Book. In his teaching, writing and composition, Adams has been hailed as a “philosopher/craftsman, attempting to reflect and render the truth as he observes and feels it, in all its complexity and its simplicity.” In the second of his Tanner lectures, Adams discusses how signal events in a nation's history can rise to the mythic level and why, despite controversies, he regards these mythic events as rich and legitimate material for musical and dramatic treatment.
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John Adams
Doctor Faustus and His Composition: Reflections on Thomas Mann's Fictional Composer
Tanner Lecture - 10/28/2009
SUMMARY: Known for moving American concert music away from academic modernism and toward a more expansive humanist musical language, Adams brings wide ranging creative insight to his Tanner Lectures. As well as his renowned orchestral and choral work and politically charged operas, Adams’ recent memoir, “Hallelujah Junction: Composing an American Life,” has been lauded as an explication of the creative process and was named a New York Times Notable Book. In his teaching, writing and composition, Adams has been hailed as a “philosopher/craftsman, attempting to reflect and render the truth as he observes and feels it, in all its complexity and its simplicity.”
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Adina Hoffman
Map of a Vanished Town: Recollecting the Palestinian Past through Biography
Franke Lecture - 10/7/2009
SUMMARY: Adina Hoffman is the author of House of Windows: Portraits from a Jerusalem Neighborhood and My Happiness Bears No Relation to Happiness: A Poet's Life in the Palestinian Century, a biography of Taha Muhammad Ali, published by Yale University Press. Her essays and criticism have appeared in The Nation, Raritan, the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, New York Newsday, World Literature Today, and on the World Service of the BBC. In her 2008 Franke Lecture, Hoffman talks about the relation between the life of Palestinian poet Taha Muhammad Ali and the erased physical and psychic landscape of his former village.
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Joseph Prabhu
Cross-Cultural Reflections on Religion and Science
Shulman Lecture - 4/11/2009
SUMMARY: Joseph Prabhu, a Professor at California State University, Los Angeles, speaks on cross-cultural reflections on religion and science at the third Shulman Lecture of 2008 at the Whitney Humanities Center. He reflects philosophically on the concept of cosmology, and asks about ideas about the beginning and end of the universe.
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Guy Consolmagno
Heaven or Heat Death? Christian and Scientific Perspectives...
Shulman Lecture - 4/8/2009
SUMMARY: Brother Guy Consolmagno SJ, distinguished guest and planetary scientist at the Vatican Observatory, discusses religious and scientific views of the end of the Universe at the second Shulman Lecture of 2008 at the Whitney Humanities Center.
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Taede Smedes
A Universe of One's Own: Cosmology, Theology and Atheology
Shulman Lecture - 4/1/2009
SUMMARY: Prof. Taede Smedes explores cosmology, theology and atheology in his talk as first lecturer for the Shulman Lectures at the Whitney Humanities Center. In 'A Universe of One's Own', Prof. Smedes weighs the many different views of the big bang theory, from the perspective of the evolutionists, scientists, creationists and the church.
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Bernard Lightman
How the Victorians Learned about Darwin’s Theories: Popularizing Evolution
Shulman Lecture - 4/1/2009
SUMMARY: Bernard Lightman’s research focuses on the cultural history of Victorian science. In speaking about the popularization of and attacks upon Darwin’s theories of evolution and natural selection, he draws on his 2007 study Victorian Popularizers of Science.
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Peter Cole
Poetry Reading
Whitney Humanities Center - 2/11/2009
SUMMARY: In his 2009 poetry reading at the Whitney Humanities Center, award-winning poet and translator Peter Cole reads poems by medieval poets writing in Spanish and Hebrew, as well as from his own recent work, some of which also draws on medieval sources.
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Janet Browne
Darwin and the Challenge of Biography
Shulman Lecture - 2/4/2009
SUMMARY: Janet Browne is a leading specialist on Charles Darwin and his life’s work. An associate editor of the early volumes of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin, she is also the author of a definitive two-volume biography, Charles Darwin: Voyaging (1995) and Charles Darwin: The Power of Place (2002). Hailed for its innovative examination of how scientific knowledge was gathered and disseminated in the nineteenth century, her study was awarded the James Tait Black Award for Nonfiction, the W. H. Heinemann Prize from the Royal Literary Society, and the Pfizer Prize from the History of Science Society, among others.
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Patricia Cannon Willis (intro)
John Ashbery, Robert Creeley, Louise Glück, John Hollander, Donald Justice, Stanley Kunitz, W.S. Merwin, Gary Snyder, Mary Strand, and Richard Wilbur
Yale, A place for poetry: The Bollingen Prize for Poetry at Yale, 1949-2002
Whitney Humanities Center - 9/20/2002
SUMMARY: Celebrating the Bollingen Prize for Poetry at Yale, nearly all the living winners of this prestigious prize are brought together for a group reading sponsored by the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and the Whitney Humanities Center. The recording begins with a brief introduction to the Bollingen program and recipients of the prize by Patricia Cannon Willis, the Elizabeth Wakeman Dwight Curator of the Yale Collection of American Literature at the Beinecke Library. Following her introduction, each winner of the Bollingen Prize, in alphebetical order, reads a selection from his or her work. There are readings by prize winners John Ashbery, Robert Creeley, Louise Glück, John Hollander, Donald Justice, Stanley Kunitz, W.S. Merwin, Gary Snyder, Mary Strand, and Richard Wilbur. This event took place at the Center Church on the Green on Friday, September 20, 2002.
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